It is what it is…or not, by Rick Elmore

Rick and I hate this phrase and now he’s put out a longer argument why: “It is what it is” or things T. W. Adorno would have hated | environmental critique. Here’s Rick:

People probably can’t help the occasional recourse to banal tautologies. Phrases like “it is what it is” have a certain sports radio, ‘works in almost any conversation’ kind of appeal. It’s like describing a team as “strong up front” or affirming a statement with “you can’t stop a train.” No one really knows exactly what you mean, but it sounds just concrete enough that everyone goes home happy. Yet, what’s truly pernicious about this phrase and what connects it to Adorno’s work isn’t that it’s tautological or unimaginative, but rather that it is a shorthand way of naturalizing the current state of the world.

Brian Jordan Jefferson on Policing, Whiteness, and the Death-Wage 

An excellent commentary at the Society and Space open site by Brian Jorden Jefferson on Policing, Whiteness, and the Death-Wage | Society and space This follows another contribution at S&S on Black Lives Matter: Deborah Cowen and Nemoy Lewis’ Anti-blackness and urban geopolitical economy: Reflections on Ferguson and the suburbanization of the ‘internal colony’.

In Phenomenological Reviews, a look at an Edited Collection on the Black Notebooks

Jeff Malplas and Ingo Farin edited the collection, which contains a cast of many well-known Heidegger specialists. It is, on the whole, more sympathetic to Heidegger (or what is culled down as his real thought, rather than the anti-semitism) than I expected: Ingo Farin, Jeff Malpas (Eds.): Reading Heidegger’s Black Notebooks 1931-1941 – Phenomenological Reviews