Month: April 2016

Hegel and the Concept of World History | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

CRMEP has up the audio of its Hegel and Concept of World History event from April 14 and 15 of last week here. Here’s the description:

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.
Plenary speakers

  •     Stefania Achella (University of Chieti, Pescara & Ecole Normale Supérieure of Pisa)
  •     Myriam Bienenstock (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours)
  •     Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University)
  •     George di Giovanni (McGill University)
  •     Bruno Haas (University of Dresden)
  •     Jean- Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne)

Three Events at MUN this week

It’s a busy week here at MUN:

First, there is tomorrow’s monthly public lecture at the Ship downtown. I will be presenting, with graduate student Steph Butera, on violence and politics. Here are the deets: “A Violent Exchange: Philosophy on Violence” What is the difference between just and unjust violence, and what makes an act violent or non-violent? 8:30 pm, April 19th, The Ship Pub (downtown). This follows from Butera’s reading course with me. Figures mentioned will include Zizek, Fanon, Badiou, and Butler.

Second, there’s this week’s conference at MUN, Texts and Contexts, which is held annually. I’ll be presenting on Latour’s Theology. Program (pdf) here. The theme is on violence, coincidentally enough given the public lecture, though I won’t quite be presenting on that.

Third, our doctoral students are hosting a graduate conference (program, Word doc, here). The keynote is the always excellent Marc De Kesel (Saint Paul University), “The Topicality of Meta: What about Metaphysics Today?” which takes place Friday evening and takes up the conference’s theme of the possible renewal of metaphysics.