Scott McLemee at Inside Higher Ed on the Ethics of the Posthumous Foucault

Here:

“Don’t pull the Max Brod [the friend who refused to burn all of Kafka’s materials upon his death] trick on me,” Michel Foucault is said to have admonished friends. The philosopher and historian did Kafka one better by including a blunt, categorical line in his will: “No posthumous publications.”

Be that as it may, in late spring the University of Minnesota Press issued Language, Madness, and Desire: On Literature, a volume of short texts by Foucault originally published in France two years ago and translated by Robert Bonnono. The same press and translator also turned the surviving pages of an autobiographical interview from 1968 into a little book with big margins called Speech Begins After Death. The title is kind of meta, since Foucault, like Kafka, seems to be having an unusually wordy afterlife.

via Essay on Michel Foucault’s posthumous publications | InsideHigherEd.