Month: August 2015

Fail Slow, Fail Hard – The Los Angeles Review of Books

Martin Woessner (CUNY) reviews Peter Trawny’s Freedom to Fail: Heidegger’s Anarchy (Polity, 2015), which I just recently read. In fact, I wrote up a review to send the LARB on it, but wanted to wait a few days to look at it again to copy edit, which is all for the best since Woessner does an excellent job with it. Trawny’s book is essentially a reading of Heidegger’s Nazism through the prism of Heidegger’s thinking, or at least one interpretation of it. Thus great thinking leads to errancy, and so on. I honestly had a hard time to know what to make of it, since it seemed at once greatly critical and on the other is written in such Heideggerese as to ennoble repeatedly the greatness of the very thinker in question. I’ll get that out soon and post a link (I don’t think I’ll publish a book review again that isn’t open access) but Woessner’s review here hits on my own response and is well worth a read:

How tolerant you are of this kind of thinking [Trawny’s repeated turn back to Heidegger’s claim that only great thinking could lead to errancy]  will determine how persuasive you find Trawny’s defense of Heidegger’s errancy, which entails accepting at least three interrelated things: first, that Heidegger’s errancy was a necessary component of his thinking; second, that his thinking was destined by the history of being going back to Ancient Greece; and third, that this tragic narrative exists not just beyond good and evil, but also beyond guilt and responsibility, in an “abyss of freedom.” In other words, true thinking means never having to say you’re sorry.

Source: Fail Slow, Fail Hard – The Los Angeles Review of Books

The order of the Homo Sacer series | An und für sich

Adam Kotsko has put up the slightly revised order of Agamben’s Homo Sacer series. I’ve largely let the last few published volumes go without much of a look–I published a long (if too complicated) chapter on him in The State of Sovereignty and since then just have avoided him for lack of time (or a compelling article that tells me there’s much of particular interest).

First Volume of English translation of Heidegger’s ‘Black Notebooks’ to appear in 2016

Progressive Geographies

The first volume of the English translation of Heidegger’s ‘Black Notebooks’ will appear in 2016 with Indiana University Press.

9780253020673_med

Ponderings II–VI begins the much-anticipated English translation of Martin Heidegger’s “Black Notebooks.” In a series of small notebooks with black covers, Heidegger confided sundry personal observations and ideas over the course of 40 years. The five notebooks in this volume were written between 1931–1938 and thus chronicle Heidegger’s year as Rector of the University of Freiburg during the Nazi era. Published in German as volume 94 of the Complete Works, these challenging and fascinating journal entries shed light on Heidegger’s philosophical development regarding his central question of what it means to be, but also on his relation to National Socialism and the revolutionary atmosphere of the 1930s in Germany. Readers previously familiar only with excerpts taken out of context may now determine for themselves whether the controversy and censure the “Black Notebooks”…

View original post 31 more words

First Volume of English translation of Heidegger’s ‘Black Notebooks’ to appear in 2016

Progressive Geographies

The first volume of the English translation of Heidegger’s ‘Black Notebooks’ will appear in 2016 with Indiana University Press.

9780253020673_med

Ponderings II–VI begins the much-anticipated English translation of Martin Heidegger’s “Black Notebooks.” In a series of small notebooks with black covers, Heidegger confided sundry personal observations and ideas over the course of 40 years. The five notebooks in this volume were written between 1931–1938 and thus chronicle Heidegger’s year as Rector of the University of Freiburg during the Nazi era. Published in German as volume 94 of the Complete Works, these challenging and fascinating journal entries shed light on Heidegger’s philosophical development regarding his central question of what it means to be, but also on his relation to National Socialism and the revolutionary atmosphere of the 1930s in Germany. Readers previously familiar only with excerpts taken out of context may now determine for themselves whether the controversy and censure the “Black Notebooks”…

View original post 31 more words