How will life extension transform punishment? – Ross Andersen – Aeon

This article has been making the rounds. Oddly, its premise is this:

One way or another, humans could soon be in a position to create an artificial hell.

We have indeed already created wholes of oblivions before, as Arendt called them. And scroll towards the end and you see the limits of the discussions “humaneness” and limits to “cruelty” that Derrida identifies well in The Death Penalty Lectures as giving into the argument of non-abolitionists, even for a supposed post-human future. The armchair philosophical questions are horrifyingly thrown out there:

Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free? When we ask that question, the goal isn’t simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments – the goal is to look at today’s punishments through the lens of the future.

via How will life extension transform punishment? – Ross Andersen – Aeon.