Michael Marder on Derrida and Alienation

From a review in NDPR of Simon Skempton’s Alienation after Derrida (Continuum: 2010), Marder argues against the fetish for the Other in recent Continental discourse:

It is no secret that contemporary philosophy is under the spell of the Other. A host of rather automatic, ethico-political associations follows the invocations of “otherness” like a comet-tail: hospitality, respect, tolerance, diversity, multiculturalism, etc. We are urged to come to terms with that which is alien, to learn to live with foreignness, to recognize the uncanny — in Freud’s vernacular, the “strangely familiar” — within us, to derive our very sense of identity from alterity. The approaches to alterity, in turn, may be broadly classified into those that are purely formal in their refusal to endow the Other with determinate features or objective characteristics and those that fill it with concrete, infinitely variable content, depending on the Other’s race, sex, gender, economic status, and so on. Still, regardless of the elected framework and of the qualifier “radical” often attached to it, “otherness” is domesticated not only as a hegemonic concept that, rather than awakening, brings critical thinking to a halt, but also as a bearer of intransigent humanism, willing to confer this title on no being other than human. Although the current theoretical interest in animal alterities goes a long way toward undoing such domestication, it is ultimately insufficient for the purpose of questioning the hegemonic status of the Other.

Given that I was just going over Marx’s concept of alienation in the Marx reading group last night, this reminds me to take a look at this book, for which Marder claims: “The anachronism of a return to alienation in the aftermath of its discrediting as a philosophical fiction is at the heart of this study, which wishes to carve out a niche for the concept already processed by the deconstructive machinery and, thus, purged of metaphysical overtones.”