Getting a position to get a position

I remember when I first took the job at the University of San Diego, one of things I heard a couple of times—from people I dearly love in academia—is that USD would be a good place to move from. This means that USD, a good school, would be a better launching pad than a rural, small humanities school. I tend to be change-averse (whatever my political positions), but I still wonder about saying that to someone who just got a job. Leave aside the people looking for jobs now gritting their teeth reading this, but I do wonder if people are really unhappy where they are and are generally looking to move. For me, I was lucky on the job market, got to see several places during the process, and in the end chose well. I’m in a pluralistic, analytic department, but have some good colleagues (none of them read this, so I can say that), all of whom I wouldn’t mind having dinner with. That’s saying a lot. So, I would love to avoid ever going on the job market again, and thus I don’t really get people who get positions to get other positions.

Of course, I’m in San Diego, which, having grown up in NYC and having lived in Chicago, took some time to adjust to. But it’s a beautiful, sunny place. There is no culture here, but then again, it’s not western Fill-in-your-Hated-State. Someone asked me again recently when I would go out on the market again. Which makes you worry if they heard something that I should know about. Everyone has complaints, but I guess being Continental in orientation, as well as doing Africana philosophy, I had low expectations for the market for me. I have a job where I can teach generally what I want, given departmental needs and gen ed courses. But since I don’t hate teaching, the gen ed courses aren’t bad. Yes, it’s frustrating to teach Homer to students who only know him from the Simpsons. I’m sure this is rambling, but in here was just trying to say something about the odd phil-circuit question about when you plan to move…