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Henri Lefebvre, open access in Antipode – ‘The Theory of Ground Rent and Rural Sociology’

Originally posted on AntipodeFoundation.org:

39078-1Hot off the press this week we have something special courtesy of Stuart Elden (University of Warwick) and Adam David Morton (University of Sydney) – a translation (by Warwick’s Matthew Dennis) of Henri Lefebvre’s 1956 essay ‘Théorie de la rente foncière et sociologie rurale’ / ‘The Theory of Ground Rent and Rural Sociology’.

La renta de la tierra 5 ensayosIt was first published in the Transactions of the Third World Congress of Sociology, and later reprinted in Lefebvre’s Du rural à l’urbain (1970/2001). There are two Spanish translations available, in La renta de la tierra (1983) and De lo rural a lo urbano (1971), and this is the first time it has been available in English.

De lo rural a lo urbanoAs Stuart and Adam note in their introduction, ‘Thinking Past Henri Lefebvre’, Lefebvre will be known to most geographers for his prodigious work on everyday life, the city / urban society, the production of…

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Interview with Maurizio Ferraris by Peter Gratton

Peter Gratton:

My interview with Maurizio Ferraris is up at Society and Space’s open site.

Originally posted on Society and space:

Screen Shot 2015-07-17 at 6.24.57 AMMaurizio Ferraris is one of the best-known and most important Italian philosophers writing today. A former student of Gianni Vattimo and collaborator with Jacques Derrida—he is perhaps best known to Anglophone audiences for their co-edited Taste for the Secret (Il gusto del segreto, first published in Italian in 1997)—Ferraris has been a longstanding professor of philosophy in the Department of Literature and Philosophy at the University of Turin. His work for some thirty years, dating to the early 1980s, developed through important interventions and reinterpretations of hermeneutics and then poststructuralist philosophy. (See a list of his dozens of works here.)

Peter Gratton, of the Department of Philosophy at Memorial University of Newfoundland, is a former co-editor and current editorial board member of Society and Space. His most recent book is Speculative Realism: Problems and Prospects (Bloomsbury, 2014), and he runs the blog Philosophy in a Time…

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Hypatia has new reviews online

Purushottama Bilimoria and Dina Al-Kassim (editors)
NEW DELHI: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2014
Reviewed by Geoffery Berney, 2015
Alexander G. Weheliye
DURHAM: DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2014
Reviewed by Megan H. Glick, 2015
Judith Butler
NEW YORK: FORDHAM UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2015
Reviewed by Susan Hekman, 2015
Shannon Sullivan
ALBANY: STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PRESS, 2014
Reviewed by Katie Stockdale, 2015
Tina Chanter and Sean D. Kirkland (editors)
ALBANY: STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PRESS, 2014
Reviewed by Tuija Pulkkinen, 2015
Included in the Emancipation Special Issue, edited by Susanne Lettow
Victoria Browne
NEW YORK: PALGRAVE MACMILLAN, 2014
Reviewed by Eva von Redecker, 2015
Included in the Emancipation Special Issue, edited by Susanne Lettow
Margaret Grebowicz
STANFORD: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2013
Reviewed by Melissa Mosko, 2015

My Review of Brown and Lazzarato on Neoliberalism at LARB

The essay, Company of One: The Fate of Democracy in an Age of Neoliberalism, takes up Brown’s Undoing the Demos: Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution (2015) and Lazarrato’s Governing by Debt (2015, but first published in Italian in 2013). Both books are anchored in readings and responses to Foucault’s 1978-9 lecture course The Birth of Biopolitics as well as the shift (oddly Lazzarato, despite long discussions of Foucault, kept conflating liberalism and neoliberalism, using the terms interchangeably) that Foucault was attempting to mark. Their analyses are in many ways congruent, though their last chapters reveal divergent projects for the left, with Brown arguing for bolstering “liberal” forms of politics being lost to neoliberalism and Lazzarato saying all forms of politics need to be rendered inoperative.

Those Odd Greeks

Later today, I’ll have a post up on neoliberalism at the LARB (I’ll share the link when I get it), but in the mean time, you have to love those supposedly irrational regulations the Greeks have, as given by Steven Rattner at the NYT:

Take, as one small example, medications. Greece is one of the few European countries that sets prices for over-the-counter drugs, which can be sold only in licensed pharmacies, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reported. Pharmacies must be owned by licensed pharmacists and they can each own only one. Other rules dictate where new pharmacies may open, as well as their operating hours. As a result, prices for consumers are higher, as are retail margins for the pharmacies.

Crazy–they set prices! They make sure pharmacists don’t own more than one store so, you know, they can actually manage those stores as, what’s the word, pharmacists–that is, dispensing of drugs shouldn’t be done by underpaid staff at far flung locations. Maybe there’s better ways to do things, but I don’t know–I tend to think that’s up to the Greeks to decide since maybe Rattner thinks Greeks overregulate their economy, but perhaps we can agree it’s not up to the Germans to overregulate how Greeks do these things.

via Overregulating Life in Greece – The New York Times.