Interview with Joseph Masco by Sonia Grant

Originally posted on Society and space:

Joseph Masco is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is the author of The Nuclear Borderlands: The Manhattan Project in Post-Cold War New Mexicowinner of the J. I. Staley Prize from the School for Advanced Research, the Rachel Carson Prize from the Society for the Social Studies of Science, and the Robert K. Merton Prize from the American Sociology Association. His current work examines the evolution of the national security state in the United States, with a particular focus on the interplay between affect, technology, and threat perception within a national public sphere.

Sonia Grant is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. Her work focuses on the environment and environmental regulations, and the rise of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in the US, and her article “Securing tar sands circulation: risk, affect, and anticipating the Line 9 reversal” appears…

View original 369 more words

Radio France Culture: Michel Foucault : Théories et institutions pénales.

Originally posted on Foucault News:

L’Essai et la revue du jour
par Jacques Munier

France Culture, 9 June 2015
Audio

Michel Foucault : Théories et institutions pénales. Cours au Collège de France 1971-1972 (EHESS/Gallimard/Seuil)

« C’est un document exceptionnel » préviennent les éditeurs François Ewald et Bernard E. Harcourt dans le texte qu’ils consacrent à la Situation du cours, à la fois dans l’époque – l’immédiat après mai 68 et l’émergence de « nouveaux mouvements sociaux – mais aussi dans le parcours intellectuel de Foucault, dont c’est le deuxième cours prononcé au Collège de France. On voit dans ces treize leçons prendre forme la méthode généalogique qui sera sa « marque de fabrique », ainsi que sa théorie du pouvoir, saisi à travers la diversité de ses applications concrètes (police, justice, prison, folie, médecine, sexualité etc.) Il s’agit en l’occurrence de montrer la naissance au XVIIe siècle absolutiste de l’appareil répressif moderne et de l’État…

View original 636 more words

Radio France Culture: Michel Foucault : Théories et institutions pénales.

Originally posted on Foucault News:

L’Essai et la revue du jour
par Jacques Munier

France Culture, 9 June 2015
Audio

Michel Foucault : Théories et institutions pénales. Cours au Collège de France 1971-1972 (EHESS/Gallimard/Seuil)

« C’est un document exceptionnel » préviennent les éditeurs François Ewald et Bernard E. Harcourt dans le texte qu’ils consacrent à la Situation du cours, à la fois dans l’époque – l’immédiat après mai 68 et l’émergence de « nouveaux mouvements sociaux – mais aussi dans le parcours intellectuel de Foucault, dont c’est le deuxième cours prononcé au Collège de France. On voit dans ces treize leçons prendre forme la méthode généalogique qui sera sa « marque de fabrique », ainsi que sa théorie du pouvoir, saisi à travers la diversité de ses applications concrètes (police, justice, prison, folie, médecine, sexualité etc.) Il s’agit en l’occurrence de montrer la naissance au XVIIe siècle absolutiste de l’appareil répressif moderne et de l’État…

View original 636 more words

Rick Elmore reviews my Realism book at Symposium

It is quite lovely and kind review:

Gratton provides a comprehensive review of thinkers associated with speculative realism (including Meillassoux, Harman, Brassier, and Grant), as well as thinkers of realism and materialism outside this group (Bennett, Grosz, Johnston, and Malabou among others). In addition to these critical summaries, Gratton also charts what he sees as the failure of continental realism to provide a substantive account of time, a failure that endangers the very project of realism, as it risks a static and idealized account of “the real.” He concludes with a brief but provocative account of his own concept of “real time” modeled on Derrida’s notion of writing as both difference and deferral. Thus Speculative Realism is a profoundly timely text, powerfully connecting realism, phenomenology, deconstruction, and hermeneutics…

via Peter Gratton, Speculative Realism » CSCP / SCPC.

New Reviews at Antipode

On some important recent work:

Christopher Taylor (University of Chicago) on Martha Schoolman’s Abolitionist Geographies;

Ian Shaw (University of Glasgow) on Grégoire Chamayou’s Drone Theory and Adam Rothstein’s Drone;

Karen McCallum (University of London) on Gita Sen and Marina Durano’s The Remaking of Social Contracts: Feminists in a Fierce New World;

via Book Reviews, etc. | AntipodeFoundation.org.